Gothic Wedding Cakes

Posted in: Wedding Cakes by Ana Petrescu | September 15th 2011 | 4 comments

Same as a gothic wedding can vary from an elegant one to one that is centered on unusual motifs, the wedding cake can have designs and styles that match the bride and groom’s preferences. At an elegant and classical wedding, the cake should have the classical Renaissance design, whereas if the wedding is modern and fun, you can relate the cake to the modern interpretation of the gothic style. No matter which one you prefer, make sure to have enough money to make your ideas come true, as they can be a little too costly.

If you think of the gothic architecture, you will instantly see the elegance and complex design and the stained glass windows filled with colors. You can adopt this style and make the cake intricate and architectural, with pops of colors or you can choose only the topper to have this style. In shops you may find a cathedral or a gothic castle topper and if not you will have to ask the baker to create it. For those of you who want the entire cake to express the idea of an architectural piece which belongs to the gothic style, try to design it as a cathedral or a building. Use gray icing on the main part of the cake and embellish it with colored details that look like stained glass windows. Finish this look with a topper that represents a prince and a princess.

Gothic Wedding Cake (Source: media.cakecentral.com)

Gothic Wedding Cake (Source: media.cakecentral.com)

Not only had the architecture specific characteristics, but also the dresses which were designed in that period. They were made using several layers, with lace and usually had corsets. So, your wedding cake should look like a piece of material, with folds and layers. This look can be obtained with colored frosting and if you have the cake made by a professional baker, some details which resemble the lace can be added. To add the finishing touch, simply adorn the cake with jewlery, using cameos or pearls.

Gothic Wedding Cake (Source: gothic-culture.com)

Gothic Wedding Cake (Source: gothic-culture.com)

Nowadays, most of the people who think of a gothic wedding think also of black and white or dark hues. Here you have two possibilities for gothic wedding cakes: you can create a white base and add black details or you can do the other way around. Conventional brides won’t think too much before deciding to go with the first idea, but certainly modern ones will love to have a unique black cake. We will detail the first option, as this one is preferred by most of the brides. The cake will have white icing and then black details will be added. These details can vary from black roses to black cake paintings. Instead of these, the baker could create some black decorations that look like jewlery and then these could be used for embellishing all the sides of the white cake, thus creating the impression that these details look like the pieces of a chandelier. Of course, if you opt for the black and white color scheme for the cake, the decorations from the reception have to belong to this scheme as well.

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Ana Petrescu

Written by , date Sep 15, 2011 in Wedding Cakes
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